Marina: “The REAL Fat Camp”

16 06 2009

In a lot of ways, Fat Camp was a pretty typical Big Moves Boston production: sexy, upbeat, rah-rah-go-fattie in as many ways as we could jam in the show. There was so much of that energy that it tended to spill over the top and mix up into the rest of our lives.

The show ran for two weekends in the Boston area, and one jam-packed weekend in Philly, and every day of the run felt a little to me like Fat Camp: in-jokes, shared snacks, generalized lechery. On tech night the cast sat down and hand-colored the covers of 300 program booklets (very art cabin!). One evening before call, we all sat out in Harvard Common and put our heads on one another’s laps and nommed down sushi and bubble tea. Add onto that the whole story arc of Fat Camp, four weeks in the life of a body-positive summer camp, and then, I mean, we’d been working together for three and a half months, so yeah, very realistic feel of collective effort and fun.

But I didn’t know how much that came through until one of the dancers, Colette, shared a conversation she had with an audience member in Philly. It was at intermission, and Colette was mingling in the audience (she was playing a camp counselor, so that was an important part of the role). This guy came up to her and said, “So, is Fat Camp for kids, or adults too?” Colette was, like, wait, you already saw the first act, you don’t know? But she said, “Oh, we’re playing adults, you know, it’s like summer camp for adults.” And he said, “No, I mean the real Fat Camp.”

Excuse me. I just got teary-eyed all over again.

I mean, it’s not like we don’t have enough going on. Even the thought of adding a summer camp program to our offerings gives me speed-induced vertigo. But the fact that someone in our audience believed so much in the world that we created that they wanted to join us, well… actually… that’s the whole point.

In a lot of ways, Fat Camp was a pretty typical Big Moves Boston production: sexy, upbeat, rah-rah-go-fattie in as many ways as we could jam in the show. There was so much of that energy that it tended to spill over the top and mix up into the rest of our lives.

The show ran for two weekends in the Boston area, and one jam-packed weekend in Philly, and every day of the run felt a little to me like Fat Camp: in-jokes, shared snacks, generalized lechery. On tech night the cast sat down and hand-colored the covers of 300 program booklets (very art cabin!). One evening before call, we all sat out in Harvard Common and put our heads on one another’s laps and nommed down sushi and bubble tea. Add onto that the whole story arc of Fat Camp, four weeks in the life of a body-positive summer camp, and then, I mean, we’d been working together for three and a half months, so yeah, very realistic feel of collective effort and fun.

But I didn’t know how much that came through until one of the dancers, Colette, shared a conversation she had with an audience member in Philly. It was at intermission, and Colette was mingling in the audience (she was playing a camp counselor, so that was an important part of the role). This guy came up to her and said, “So, is Fat Camp for kids, or adults too?” Colette was, like, wait, you already saw the first act, you don’t know? But she said, “Oh, we’re playing adults, you know, it’s like summer camp for adults.” And he said, “No, I mean the _real_ Fat Camp.”

Excuse me. I just got teary-eyed all over again.

I mean, it’s not like we don’t have enough going on. Even the thought of adding a summer camp program to our offerings gives me speed-induced vertigo. But the fact that someone in our audience _believed_ so much in the world that we created that they wanted to join us, well… actually… that’s the whole point.

Advertisements

Actions

Information

5 responses

16 06 2009
The Rotund

I would hella spend a month at Fat Camp for real.

16 06 2009
withoutscene

Wait, so he was wanting to go to the kind of fat camp you created, not a typical one?

17 06 2009
Ida

id join, if there was one.

23 06 2009
bigmovesboston

Yep! It was so cute, we all thought we were going to cry.

23 06 2009
bigmovesboston

It would be awesome times, for sure.

Now if only we could all quit our jobs and make this happen. HA.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s




%d bloggers like this: